Textiles and the Triplett Sisters

Fabric in Fashion


Stop, before you decide not to read this blog because it doesn’t have any antique quilt photos! Take a deep breath and consider your love of fabric. Consider that dating a fabric in a quilt in many cases occurs because of the fabric is in a “costume” in a photo with a date on it or a designer’s notes. There is much to be learned and enjoyed from a costume exhibit. For the Fashionistas of the past, the textiles in their closets were one of their more valuable possessions. The New York City Museum at FIT, was the perfect place for the exhibition “Fabric in Fashion.” According to the FIT brochure, “the stylish eighteenth-century woman new the high cost of silk brocade imported from China, the difference between wool fabrics appropriate for menswear and women’s wear,...
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Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum Fabric Challenge


A recent exhibition at the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum showcased all the quilts made from the four reproduction fabric lines: Rising Sun, Cross Quilt, Bethlehem Star, and American Patch.  This exhibition also featured the quilts which inspired the reproduction fabric.  Blazing Star/Star of Bethlehem is full of indigos and cheddar, as well as Prussian Blue which makes it real eye candy. The quilt was made by a member of the Speck family c. 1860-1880. The quilt that inspired the Rising Sun fabric line, was also made by a member of the Speck family.  This quilt also uses a variation on the large main Lone Star but surrounded by blocks of more stars. The quilt is believed to have been created in 1840-1860. The Cross Quilt was made about 1880 and is a simple pattern with lots...
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Houston Quilt Festival: In the American Tradition: Appliqued


We’ve had so much to write about, I haven’t even finished your tour of the Houston Quilt Festival. However, even though the photos are from 2018, there is a little teaser about 2019 included in the blog too. This week we focus on the section, "In the American Tradition: Appliqued." Applique quilts seem to be a favorite of our readers, and while we usually focus on antiques, it is always nice to share what current quilt artists are accomplishing in the traditional style. The “Bird of Paradise” quilt by Janet Olmstead (aka Mrs. Sew n’ sew blog) is from Alberta, Canada. Be sure you check out all of the birds, squirrels and horses she included. Ginger Brant’s quilt is inspired by the Baltimore Album Quilts and more specifically by a later Civil War era quilt. She...
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Spirit of the South - of France that is!


This was our first time visiting the Pour L’Amour du Fil Quilt Show in Nantes, France. Held annually every April, it is a showcase for all things Quiltmania (publisher of quilt books and magazines) and more. I was teaching a workshop in the Netherlands shortly before the event, so we drove down to see the show and cross an item off of Kay’s bucket list. Plus, the quilt show theme was of particular interest to us. Spirit of the South focused on Pique de Marseille and Boutis, which is a chapter in our next book “Hidden Treasures.” Monique Alphand, a well-known expert on Marseille and Provencal textiles was having an exhibition of her private collection of chintz and boutis. (Yes, even though we were really there to see the boutis, Kay and I weren’t going to...
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Peacock in the Desert: The Royal Arts of Jodhpur, India


On the “to do” list for the Triplett Sisters is a trip to India to learn more about the textile treasures. But this exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, gave us a taste to remind us why India needs to stay on our bucket list. It displayed three centuries of royal treasures from the kingdom of Marwar-Johpur. Of the 250 objects on display, a large percentage of it was textiles. If you missed the exhibit in Houston, don’t worry the display travels to Seattle next Oct 18- Jan 21 and then Toronto. As we toured the exhibition I was stunned by the direct correlation to quilting. Not just the fact that chintz and other cotton fabric was included, but that shapes of jewelry replicated the feathered quilting designs we use. Or a tent...
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