Textiles and the Triplett Sisters

Something Old...


This month we purchased some vintage fabric and I couldn’t help but think of the traditional rhyme, “something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue.” With about 15 yards of this gorgeous vintage toile, Kay asked me to consider making a sample. I hesitated at first, because working with antiques so much of the time the rule is to leave it in the original condition, or “don’t touch.” But then I considered the Japanese boros which literally means tatters, where artists have taken scraps and brought new life to the fabric creating clothing, and quilts. The something old and the blue were both meant to offer protection, which the boro offers from the elements. Then, I considered the trend of “quilting vintage” where quilters are giving new life to vintage textiles from yard sales. I use...
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Discovering the Collection: A 20-Year Journey


How do you honor a 20-year career studying, preserving, and collecting quilts? By allowing the graduate student who became a curator the opportunity to showcase her work in an exhibition we can see the impact she has had. Carolyn Ducey was a grad student at Indiana University, when she applied to study quilts with Dr. Patricia Crews at the University of Nebraska. Shortly afterward she was hired as the first curator of the Center, later to become International Quilt Study Center & Museum (IQSCM.) Carolyn and Sara Dillow (the first Acquisitions Coordinator) worked together to gather some of the earliest quilts in the collection, pre-1850. Sara was also responsible for the first international additions from Kathryn Berenson, 30 white wholecloth quilts, which opened their eyes to the possibility of international textiles. At the unexpected deaths of...
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Antique Quilts of the British Isles


Although I could easily write several more blogs on the 2018 Houston Quilt Festival, this will be our last. We have too many other adventures to share with you, and I’m getting behind on the multiple antique quilt exhibitions I’ve seen lately. However, I couldn’t leave the 2018 Festival without sharing with you this special exhibition, Antique Quilts of the British Isles. It was very hard to choose which quilts to feature from this exhibit, because there were so many amazing ones. However, it is hard to ignore a quilt which has 45,000 ¼ inch hexagons. It was completed in the 1840s and exhibited at the Great Exhibition in London in 1851. This quilt was on loan to the Victoria & Albert Museum for many years. One distinctive tradition in British quilts is the center medallion...
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Medallions: History of Style


The Triplett Sisters’ love medallion quilts, particularly those that use chintz “panels” for the center. So, imagine our excitement when the American Quilt Study Group decided to make medallions the subject of the next quilt study. Yippee! That means that fifty members of the organization will be making medallion quilts. That means a traveling exhibit of medallion quilts will hit the road to spark the creativity of quilters across the nation with these medallion quilts inspired by historical quilts. Immediately after the announcement last fall, ideas began to emerge. Museums and private collections were searched for the best medallion quilt. Which one quilt would inspire a quilter so much that the quilter either wanted to reproduce the antique quilt or create a new quilt based on the antique quilt. Medallion panels were made using fabric created...
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New Year Wishes!


  May the road rise up to meet you, filled with inspiration from your dreams. May the light shine upon your project with your fabric stash un-ending. May your quilts be easy binding, as you create your legacy. May your needles be easy threading, with all your notions at hand reach, as God holds you in the palm of his hand.  
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