Textiles and the Triplett Sisters

Antique Quilts for a Cause


It has been a while since I’ve written a blog, but I thought you might need a breather after the four days in a row with our new book Hidden Treasures Blog Tour. It is hard to believe that we are halfway through the year, which made me wonder if I’d left out any amazing quilts from previous articles. Because I can only have 4-5 photos in each blog, sometimes I must make hard choices on which gems to include. However, a review of the year revealed that I’d not only left out antique quilt gems, but some exhibitions. One such exhibition was from the Mark Dunn Collection at the International Quilt Museum (formerly known as International Quilt Study Center & Museum.) In 1966 he started his career in the textile industry as a third-generation sales...
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Hidden Treasures: Blog Tour Stop #4


It is the final stop in the tour and I really appreciate everyone that came along for the trip to announce the release of the Triplett Sisters fifth book, “Hidden Treasures, Quilts from 1600 to 1860, Rarely Seen Pre-Civil War Textiles from the Poos Collection.” If you missed any of the earlier stops in the tour, check the bottom of the blog for web addresses so you can visit those stops too. The Chintz Coverlets and Quilts chapter of our book was a “must be included” with our love of chintz. We also managed to squeeze in some birds into this section. Maybe instead of a where’s waldo, we should have a where’s birdie challenge? It was also our honor to include a mezzaro re-purposed as a quilt. If you’d like to learn about a mezzaro,...
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Something Old...


This month we purchased some vintage fabric and I couldn’t help but think of the traditional rhyme, “something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue.” With about 15 yards of this gorgeous vintage toile, Kay asked me to consider making a sample. I hesitated at first, because working with antiques so much of the time the rule is to leave it in the original condition, or “don’t touch.” But then I considered the Japanese boros which literally means tatters, where artists have taken scraps and brought new life to the fabric creating clothing, and quilts. The something old and the blue were both meant to offer protection, which the boro offers from the elements. Then, I considered the trend of “quilting vintage” where quilters are giving new life to vintage textiles from yard sales. I use...
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Discovering the Collection: A 20-Year Journey


How do you honor a 20-year career studying, preserving, and collecting quilts? By allowing the graduate student who became a curator the opportunity to showcase her work in an exhibition we can see the impact she has had. Carolyn Ducey was a grad student at Indiana University, when she applied to study quilts with Dr. Patricia Crews at the University of Nebraska. Shortly afterward she was hired as the first curator of the Center, later to become International Quilt Study Center & Museum (IQSCM.) Carolyn and Sara Dillow (the first Acquisitions Coordinator) worked together to gather some of the earliest quilts in the collection, pre-1850. Sara was also responsible for the first international additions from Kathryn Berenson, 30 white wholecloth quilts, which opened their eyes to the possibility of international textiles. At the unexpected deaths of...
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Antique Quilts of the British Isles


Although I could easily write several more blogs on the 2018 Houston Quilt Festival, this will be our last. We have too many other adventures to share with you, and I’m getting behind on the multiple antique quilt exhibitions I’ve seen lately. However, I couldn’t leave the 2018 Festival without sharing with you this special exhibition, Antique Quilts of the British Isles. It was very hard to choose which quilts to feature from this exhibit, because there were so many amazing ones. However, it is hard to ignore a quilt which has 45,000 ¼ inch hexagons. It was completed in the 1840s and exhibited at the Great Exhibition in London in 1851. This quilt was on loan to the Victoria & Albert Museum for many years. One distinctive tradition in British quilts is the center medallion...
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