Textiles and the Triplett Sisters

Architect of Quilts


In Amsterdam there is a charming, more than four century old canal house (yes, over 400 years old) where the original architect of quilts lives with her artist husband. Up three flights of narrow stairs, (it was tempting to count the steps, but instead I focused on simply making it to the attic workshop without falling), a quilt artist extraordinaire works in her lair creating 3-d quilts. In the early 1970’s, Lucie Huig-Dunnebier began quilting creating three dimensional quilts. Since then she has explored various dimensional elements: raised graphics, pockets to hold treasures, windows with shutters to hide lovers, and more, pushing the dimensional boundaries of a quilt. Some of her crib quilts hung one way reveal the day colors with the sun. The same quilt hung upside down reveals the moon and the stars in...
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Fall Season Adventures!


I have a confession. For several weeks now, I’ve had writers block. It wasn’t that I didn’t know what I needed to write about, it was that I didn’t really want to write about me. I much prefer writing about other’s amazing quilts or exhibitions. So, I’ve kept putting off this blog. I decided to resolve the issue by including some fabulous antique quilts for eye candy. It will make be feel better and I hope you’ll at least read the blog to know what exciting things are coming in the fall season.   First up is another trip to the Netherlands, where I will be teaching a brand-new quilt pattern I created with 5 unique paper piecing designs. I’m thrilled to teach the workshop in Overloon, but I’m even more excited to announce that Paper...
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Hawaiian Quilts


I was interested to attend the Kauai Quilt Show sponsored by Kauai Quilt Guild and the Nene Quilters to see if the traditional “Hawaiian” style of quilts was represented. As early as 1820 the Hawaiians learned to quilt from missionaries. The distinctive style is usually created using applique of a botanical nature, frequently in one or two bold solid colors. One early written record of the traditional style Hawaiian quilt is “Six Months in the Sandwich Islands” by Isabella Bird who visited Hawaii in 1870 and described a “floral center with surrounding arabesque.” During the westernization of Hawaii, cotton fabric had become available and as the resurgence in applique mid-nineteenth century occured, it also reached Hawaii. A second traditional Hawaiian style of quilts is known as a “flag quilt” which uses the flag and or royalty,...
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The 1876 Centennial Quilt Project


This beautiful quilt owned by Barbara Menasian was purchased in Connecticut with no other provenance than what was contained in the quilt “EMC 1876.” The quilt is a medallion style with the “Chips and Whetstone” as the center piece of the sampler. The center block is surrounded by seventy-four different patterns, many which are commonly known. However, the unique arrangement of borders was then separated by a different geometric pieced row. Karen Alexander ran across a photo of the extraordinary quilt in an online history forum. Inspired by the quilt, she secured permission from the owner for a group of quilters from Northwestern Washington to re-create the quilt. Anne Dawson a quilt shop owner and quilt restorer, drafted the intricate patterns to follow the original quilt as closely as possible. Anne then used reproduction fabrics to...
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In the American Tradition - Pieced


This is part two of the special exhibition from the Houston Quilt Festival that focused on traditional quilts. This group of quilts are pieced but made recently. Our mother is fond of saying, “why would anyone cut up fabric to sew it back together again?” (The secret is out, our mother is not a quilter!) The answer to her question is apparent when you see the works of art created by sewing the pieces back together again. “The Never Ending Project” by Barb Kissell and quilted by Meg Fasio is appropriately named. Because there are A LOT of pieces, more than 3,000. The Hunter Star block must have really inspired Barb, because she had only been quilting for two years when she decided to tackle this quilt. Clearly, she does not subscribe to my mother’s theory....
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