Textiles and the Triplett Sisters

Borders and More!


As I was researching the chinoiserie panel, I saw several borders used in different quilts, which got me wondering about borders. Naturally, I then had to research border fabric that has obviously been around for some time. Also, I was surprised to see borders printed both horizontally and vertically which is convenient depending on the fabrics intended use. Border fabric was printed to be used for petticoats, with one border printed horizontally to provide a finish to the petticoat. A simpler print was used on the remainder of the fabric, which would make for easier block printing. It also allowed for one seam to be added to create the tube and as an early form of ready to wear, kept in stock. Once the petticoat was selected it could simply be fitted at the waist. Some...

Continue reading

Recent Acquisitions


Although the Poos Collection is limiting the number of new acquisitions, this month two important quilts were added to the collection. Not surprisingly both would be considered in the chintz quilt genre of the collection. A cut-out applique quilt, likely English in origin, has some of our favorite famous fabrics that we started tracking in 2012 including some Bannister Hall fabrics. For more information on the many owners of Bannister Hall, please see the link to a previous blog article providing details. When studiying the peacock fabric, it is interesting to the industrial espionage that was taking place. Changing the direction of the head was one way to avoid being accused of "copying."  The second antique quilt, also likely English, was added because of the chinoiserie panel in the center. This is the second antique quilt...

Continue reading

Upcoming Events


I’m interrupting the research to give you an update about some coming events. We’d love to see you at some of these in person events or via Zoom. In some cases, they are both an option. My long-awaited research trip to Philadelphia and New Jersey is coming up the end of May. I’ve located some original sources and I’m hopeful that will shed light on these Northern Style Cut-out Applique (NSCAs.) Thanks to AQSG for providing some of the funding for the research trip. On June 1, I’ll be presenting on NSCAs, with my presentation Delaware River Valley Quilts at Penn Dry Goods event hosted by the Schwenkfelder Museum. It looks like a fabulous event, so if you are interested in attending in person or via Zoom, here is the link. Also, those in person will...

Continue reading

NSCA: Machette & Taylor Coverlet, Crary & Beach


Dr. Mason Crary name is inscribed Dr. M. Crary with an image of bloodletting tools. (It’s hard to unsee, once you see it and think of what it shows.) He was born in 1779 in Connecticut, from there the family moved to Albany, NY where he studied medicine. In 1804 he moved to Luzerne Co where he met the Nathan Beach family, the first white settlers in the area and married the daughter Desire. Nathan Beach, an attorney, was very influential in Pennsylvania serving in the legislature and various offices for the Susquehanna and Lehigh Canal as well as the turnpike. In 1814 Dr. Crary moved to Philadelphia where he practiced as a Dr. and sold his own medicine “Dr. Crary’s Anti-bilious Family Pills.” In 1824 he sold his practice to his assistant and returned to...

Continue reading

NSCA: Machette & Taylor Coverlet, The Hyers


The Hyers are a reminder that the Machette coverlet (the earliest of this group) is less about fundraising and businesses, but more about family and neighbors. There are 10 Hyer family inscriptions, including William Jacob Hyer, who was the patriarch of the inscribers on the coverlet. William Hyer was born on December 11, 1765, in New Jersey and was admitted to the New Jersey bar in 1789. He married Sarah Chambers in 1796. (Note there are six Chambers family inscriptions on this coverlet and one on the DAR Fish Album Quilt. In addition, Emma Fish did marry into the Chambers family.) In 1807 William Hyer was a clerk for the Supreme Court, a position he held for 4 years before being appointed the Clerk of the Court of Chancery by the Governor. He had his own...

Continue reading