Textiles and the Triplett Sisters

Happy Thanksgiving!


It is hard to believe that it is already the end of November! Time has moved so slowly through this difficult year and yet, it doesn’t seem possible that Thanksgiving is almost here. This year we will be giving thanks for you! Thanks for those who read our blog, host a zoom program or workshop, participate in one of three Triplett Sisters BOM and to those who shop on our website or Etsy shop. When we lost more than 80 bookings to the pandemic, it was very disheartening. We weren’t going to be able to connect with you through our quilts. Instead we found other ways to connect. THANK YOU! To celebrate the coming holidays, we are pleased to announce three exciting developments:First, we are lowering the price of the 25” Fruit Basket Medallion to $30,...
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19th Century Bird Reproduction Fabric


As I continue to work on my quilt, Birds of Di Ford Hall, I’m continuing to explore reproduction fabric. However, in the world of fabric production that definition (a textile that is copied or reproduced with the appearance of an earlier time) can be a little deceiving. Once mass production of fabric printing began instead of hand painted, reproduction fabric followed quickly behind. We don’t always consider that reproductions fabric started almost as soon as the industrial production of fabric began, instead we tend to consider reproduction fabric as fabric “currently” being produced that mimics a different era whether civil war, 1930’s etc. It is also important to note that the reproduction fabric is rarely an exact copy, but instead may have different colors, scale, location, or background. Noting these differences can help define the period...
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New Adventures Inspired by Antique Artists


Seasons are changing which always makes me think of new projects and adventures. As I plan my September to December calendar, I wonder what project or projects will I be creating in the coming months? Sometimes the projects are a surprise. I had no idea that the Guardians of the Nest Star Quilt I was creating would become a pattern until multiple people requested it. Thank you for your enthusiasm and requests! Those comments brightened my days and the results will be available September 5th. For some time, I’ve admired Di Ford Hall fabrics and wanted to make a tribute quilt. I explored her patterns which are lovely, but I’ve always had a difficult time creating someone else’s vision. Those quilts are to be admired, but they tend to focus on one fabric line and just...
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Colonial Williamsburg


Williamsburg, Virginia was founded in 1632 and in 1698 was designated as the capital of the English Colony. It received a royal charter in 1722 and was the center of political activity before and during the revolution with George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Patrick Henry debating many of the important topics of the day such as taxes and inalienable rights to name a few. Colonial Williamsburg as we know it now was the idea of Reverend William Archer Rutherfoord Goodwin a rector of the historic Bruton Parish Church in Williamsburg. He began raising funds for the restoration of the church in 1907, and later in 1924 approached John D. Rockefeller Jr. with the idea of restoring other parts of the town. Rockefeller agreed and thus began a series of coded telegrams with Goodwin acting as Rockefeller’s...
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A Stroll through Provence


In an earlier blog, I mentioned that there was a Chintz exhibition at the Nantes Quilt Show we attended. We write about Chintz quite a bit because we love it, so I thought I would make do with the few shots in the earlier blog post. However, this week we ran onto an amazing array of reproduction fabrics, which reminded me of the fabrics of Provence. So, I decided I wasn’t done with the Nantes Quilt Show. Several people from the Association of Tresors, Patrimoine etoffes of Marseille gave a presentation on the quilts and costumes of the 18th and 19th century Provence. The organization was nice enough to provide an exhibition of the clothing as well as wear authentic clothing. Although I can’t imagine trying to go about daily tasks dressed in these outfits, not...
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