Textiles and the Triplett Sisters

It Takes Two to Tango


The exhibition was held at the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum showcasing quilts made by two people. According to the dictionary the phrase “it takes two to tango.” means, a situation or argument involving two people, both of them responsible for it. Certainly, in the case of these quilts, both parties are responsible, but there is no way it was an argument. Or if an argument occurred, it was clearly resolved.Instead we see true partnerships in quilt artistry. I expected to see all the quilts pieced or appliqued by one party and then quilted by the second party. However, in many cases the division of labor wasn’t clear cut…which definitely could lead to an argument. These quilts as a finished product were so copasetic, that clearly if a dance of discussion took place, it was resolved into...
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Fabric in Fashion


Stop, before you decide not to read this blog because it doesn’t have any antique quilt photos! Take a deep breath and consider your love of fabric. Consider that dating a fabric in a quilt in many cases occurs because of the fabric is in a “costume” in a photo with a date on it or a designer’s notes. There is much to be learned and enjoyed from a costume exhibit.For the Fashionistas of the past, the textiles in their closets were one of their more valuable possessions. The New York City Museum at FIT, was the perfect place for the exhibition “Fabric in Fashion.” According to the FIT brochure, “the stylish eighteenth-century woman new the high cost of silk brocade imported from China, the difference between wool fabrics appropriate for menswear and women’s wear, and...
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All in the Family: Friendship Quilts


I’ve recently been asked to contribute to two friendship quilts for heartbreaking reasons. The first was because a friend was diagnosed with breast cancer and the quilt was to “provide a hug” for her during treatment. Thankfully she has fully recovered from the treatment and now uses the quilt at retreats for her bed. The second quilt was for a friend whose son was killed in an accident. This quilt was also to be a comfort quilt, but since there is no way to fully recover from the loss of a child, I hope the quilt will bring her love and comfort for many years.So, when the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum had an exhibition about friendship quilts called: All in the Family: Family and Album Quilts, I was curious about the reasons the quilts were created....
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Something Old...


This month we purchased some vintage fabric and I couldn’t help but think of the traditional rhyme, “something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue.” With about 15 yards of this gorgeous vintage toile, Kay asked me to consider making a sample. I hesitated at first, because working with antiques so much of the time the rule is to leave it in the original condition, or “don’t touch.” But then I considered the Japanese boros which literally means tatters, where artists have taken scraps and brought new life to the fabric creating clothing, and quilts. The something old and the blue were both meant to offer protection, which the boro offers from the elements. Then, I considered the trend of “quilting vintage” where quilters are giving new life to vintage textiles from yard sales. I use...
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Discovering the Collection: A 20-Year Journey


How do you honor a 20-year career studying, preserving, and collecting quilts? By allowing the graduate student who became a curator the opportunity to showcase her work in an exhibition we can see the impact she has had. Carolyn Ducey was a grad student at Indiana University, when she applied to study quilts with Dr. Patricia Crews at the University of Nebraska. Shortly afterward she was hired as the first curator of the Center, later to become International Quilt Study Center & Museum (IQSCM.)Carolyn and Sara Dillow (the first Acquisitions Coordinator) worked together to gather some of the earliest quilts in the collection, pre-1850. Sara was also responsible for the first international additions from Kathryn Berenson, 30 white wholecloth quilts, which opened their eyes to the possibility of international textiles. At the unexpected deaths of Sara...
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