Lori Lee Triplett, Business Manager for Quilt and Textile Collections, has successfully combined a variety of passions which include research, writing, and performing into the quilt world. As a lecturer and instructor she brings her experience from stage, screen, and radio to make the presentations fun yet educational. She enjoys presenting at loca...l quilt guilds, but also presents at national conferences and has made appearances internationally. More

All in the Family: Friendship Quilts


I’ve recently been asked to contribute to two friendship quilts for heartbreaking reasons. The first was because a friend was diagnosed with breast cancer and the quilt was to “provide a hug” for her during treatment. Thankfully she has fully recovered from the treatment and now uses the quilt at retreats for her bed. The second quilt was for a friend whose son was killed in an accident. This quilt was also to be a comfort quilt, but since there is no way to fully recover from the loss of a child, I hope the quilt will bring her love and comfort for many years. So, when the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum had an exhibition about friendship quilts called: All in the Family: Family and Album Quilts, I was curious about the reasons the quilts were...
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Something Old...


This month we purchased some vintage fabric and I couldn’t help but think of the traditional rhyme, “something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue.” With about 15 yards of this gorgeous vintage toile, Kay asked me to consider making a sample. I hesitated at first, because working with antiques so much of the time the rule is to leave it in the original condition, or “don’t touch.” But then I considered the Japanese boros which literally means tatters, where artists have taken scraps and brought new life to the fabric creating clothing, and quilts. The something old and the blue were both meant to offer protection, which the boro offers from the elements. Then, I considered the trend of “quilting vintage” where quilters are giving new life to vintage textiles from yard sales. I use...
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Discovering the Collection: A 20-Year Journey


How do you honor a 20-year career studying, preserving, and collecting quilts? By allowing the graduate student who became a curator the opportunity to showcase her work in an exhibition we can see the impact she has had. Carolyn Ducey was a grad student at Indiana University, when she applied to study quilts with Dr. Patricia Crews at the University of Nebraska. Shortly afterward she was hired as the first curator of the Center, later to become International Quilt Study Center & Museum (IQSCM.) Carolyn and Sara Dillow (the first Acquisitions Coordinator) worked together to gather some of the earliest quilts in the collection, pre-1850. Sara was also responsible for the first international additions from Kathryn Berenson, 30 white wholecloth quilts, which opened their eyes to the possibility of international textiles. At the unexpected deaths of...
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I am a Treasure Hunter!


Cheddar Quilts from the Joanna S. Rose Collection, is an exhibition that ran at the International Study Center Oct 2018 – Feb 2019. As you walk into the exhibition area you are greeted with a quote from Joanna, “I am not a collector. I am a treasure hunter. A collector always wants to better a collection. I buy only what I like and for no other reason. Quilts look better when you have a lot of them.” I love that quote and think it truly explains her appreciation of quilts. Joanna Rose began purchasing quilts in the 1950’s hunting for bargains at flea markets and thrift stores. She started buying the chrome orange quilts to use as décor for Thanksgiving. Mrs. Rose believes “that bright orange has a warmth that transcends the literal warmth of a...
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Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum Fabric Challenge


A recent exhibition at the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum showcased all the quilts made from the four reproduction fabric lines: Rising Sun, Cross Quilt, Bethlehem Star, and American Patch.  This exhibition also featured the quilts which inspired the reproduction fabric.  Blazing Star/Star of Bethlehem is full of indigos and cheddar, as well as Prussian Blue which makes it real eye candy. The quilt was made by a member of the Speck family c. 1860-1880. The quilt that inspired the Rising Sun fabric line, was also made by a member of the Speck family.  This quilt also uses a variation on the large main Lone Star but surrounded by blocks of more stars. The quilt is believed to have been created in 1840-1860. The Cross Quilt was made about 1880 and is a simple pattern with lots...
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