Textiles and the Triplett Sisters

Amazing Amazona!


The Houston Quilt Festival Exhibition Hall is filled with a wide variety of special exhibitions. Although it is easy to be enticed to stay in the vendor portion of the quilt festival, the exhibit hall is the perfect place to see: different techniques, superb skill, and award winning quilts. The exhibition that caught my eye across the exhibit hall was entitled “Freehand Patchwork by Danny Amazona” and it was amazing. Besides appreciating his unique style of art quilts, this was a new technique to be observed. Danny does unorthodox freehand patchwork that is quite different from the traditional techniques. He uses no intricate sewing, but focuses on creating artwork with fabric. Danny states “since I’m using fabric to create my artwork, I want to maintain the original beauty of the textile designs on each piece of...

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Happy Holidays: International Quilt Market/Festival - Houston


It’s that time of year, the start of the holiday season.  For many people it starts with Halloween, followed by Thanksgiving, etc. For the quilter, the holiday season starts with quilt market/festival in Houston.  It is the time to see old friends, quilting family, and make new friends. So, we hope to see you in Houston!  Please feel free to stop by our exhibition, Pioneer Quilts.  Check out one of our demos at Open Studios or book signings.  Although many of my classes are sold out, I still have some places left in my Adire: Indigo Resist & Dye Class on Wednesday or the Making Material Mine on Friday afternoon.  Come up and be sure to let us know, “I read your blog.”  We love knowing it is being read! If you can’t make it to...

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Pacific Northwest Quilt & Fiber Arts Museum


Previously the La Conner Quilts museum, the Pacific Northwest Quilt & Fiber Arts Museum, is celebrating twenty years. To go with the new name, they have a new slogan: Imagine. Create. Inspire. Any nonprofit reaching the five year mark is a cause for celebration, let alone twenty years. Congrats to all who had part in making the museum happen and thrive! Besides the museums two other quilts exhibits Pieces of the Past: 20 years of Collecting and Time Flies...20th Anniversary Festival Challenge exhibit,  QTC was honored to be selected to help with the celebration. Pieces of the Prairie one of our traveling exhibitions will be there. This exhibit will give viewers in the Seattle area a firsthand look at some of the quilts from our new book, Pioneer Quilts: Prairie Settlers’ Life in Fabric. It is...

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Chintz, Glorious Chintz!


I come from a theatre background, so it isn’t unusual for lines from plays or songs from musicals to pop in my head. Especially because sometimes the song catches the mood and moment more adequately than I can.  Such was the case when Kay and I went to visit the Chintz Exhibition at Fries Museum in Leeuwarden, Netherlands. A moment when the breath is taken away…then the song begins. In the musical Oliver, the boys have been starving and craving something other than gruel. Thus begins the songs of dreams of food or in this case dreams of chintz.  If you know the tune to Food, Glorious, Food…sing along! Chintz, glorious chintz, Red colors and mustard! While we're in the mood -- Step too close you’ll get busted! Hats, coverlets, and tunics What next is the...

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Winterthur: Galleries, Part II


  Although initially our focus was drawn to the amazing quilts in the gallery, the other textiles displayed couldn’t be ignored, especially with an indigo resist taking up a large part of the display. This amazing linen textile was made in Berks County, Pennsylvania approximately 1780 – 1830. Hanging beside the indigo resist was dress fabric from the Coromandal Coast, 1775-1800. The design was created by hand instead of being block printed. The fabric bears the mark on the back of United East India Company. Additional fabrics, including one printed by Bromley Hall in this Banyan held my attention. Needlework on display was also an important contribution to the collections. Both men and women were employed in professional workshops creating amazing clothing and furnishings. A sample of whitework from New York was also included. All of...

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