Textiles and the Triplett Sisters

Bird in a Basket


As many of you may be aware, I’ve tracked the Bird in a Basket fabric for some time. It has been printed as a toile, in different colorways, and sometimes as a pillar print. It was on my list to research at some point. Trust me when I say, there are way too many topics of interest for me to research in my lifetime. However, I was really interested in it because it was next on our list of potential antique fabrics to reproduce as a column chintz.   (Sidenote, we’d like to have an idea of who would be interested in a reproduction of this Bird in a Basket as a Pillar Print. If you are, please send me an email to Info@quiltandtextilecollections.com with the number of yards. If we have enough interest…we’ll reproduce it!)...

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How to Research – Part II


Research never ends. Even when you think you’ve exhausted the resources available and come to realistic conclusions. Remember, research NEVER ends. There are new documents uncovered, or new papers added online (particularly during the pandemic), and new textiles or quilts uncovered. Sometimes an expert you relied upon concluded something that is no longer supported by your new research, because…research never ENDS. It is an important rule to remember in researching, that periodically revisiting a research topic you are passionate about is vital. Our research on Chintz fabric that was the subject of our Chintz Quilts book has continued for more than 10 years. This year at the request of the Mingei International Museum we also began re-visiting our indigo research of more than 10 years. Which brings me to our book Hidden Treasures that included research...

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How to do Research


Right now, my world is being dominated by research which I enjoy. Research is the underpinning of those interested in antique quilts and quilt history. Of course, you can simply admire the beauty of the quilt, the artistry of the quilter, and the amazing fabric used in the quilt. However, if the quilt includes a name…look out we’re off to do research, especially if it is a signature quilt with lots of names.   Genealogy websites are very useful tools in this instance. The most frequently used site for this type of research is Ancestry.com, which is great for historical records, but don’t forget MyHeritage which has a global database, or LegacyTree if you want to hire a genealogist. Your local library may have free access to these databases as well as other sources to consider....

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Exciting Events!


Although most of the time we keep the focus of the blog on actual textiles, a couple of times a year, we try to update you on what is coming up in the Triplett Sisters world. You should always feel free to check “Upcoming Events” on the bottom of our website home page. We try to keep events listed for several months ahead there. So, be sure to check the listing out and meet up with us at one of those events. The first event listed is the Pioneer Quilts Exhibition starting this month June 26 at the Lutheran Heritage Center & Museum at 75 Church St, Altenburg, MO. (Anyone feel like a road trip?) This exhibit features the Poos Collection quilts from the book Pioneer Quilts: Prairie Settlers Life in Fabric. Esther Heinzman will be...

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Ooh là là, Chintz!


The second part of the Quilt History Retreat focused on Chintz; a longtime favorite of the Triplett Sisters. Well, not just the Triplett Sisters, who doesn’t love Chintz? (Okay, I do understand that there are some people that don’t like chintz, but given that fabrics beauty, it is really hard for me to comprehend.)   Chintz first made its way to Europe in 1498, when a Portuguese explorer named Vasco da Gama returned with the fabric from India. Shortly thereafter the popularity of the imported fabric led to a decline in profits of the French fabric and therefore it was banned in 1698. Which of course meant traders or smugglers continued to bring it into the country anyway.   In 1734, a French officer M. de Beaulieu sent home letters and actual samples of chintz fabric...

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